Are there any Jews living nowadays in Germany?


I, recently, had to write an essay with the title Race, Folk and Supermen of Nazism. I am starting to get very interested about this subject and was wondering whether there are any Jews living nowadays in Germany. Are they comfortable? Don’t they feel weird? Thanks in advance for your answers.

Today, Germany is home to a nominal Jewish population of more than 200,000: 108,000 are officially registered with Jewish religious communities. Most Jews in Germany are recent immigrants from the former Soviet Union. There is also a handful of Jewish families from Muslim countries, including Iran, Turkey, Morocco, and Afghanistan. Germany has the third-largest Jewish population in Western Europe after France (600,000) and Great Britain (300,000) and the fastest-growing Jewish population in Europe in recent years. The influx of refugees, many of them seeking renewed contact with their Jewish heritage, has led to a renaissance of Jewish life on German soil. In 1996, Chabad-Lubavitch of Berlin opened a center. In 2003, Chabad-Lubavitch of Berlin ordained 10 rabbis, the first rabbis to be ordained in Germany since World War II. In 2002 a Reform rabbinical seminary, Abraham Geiger College, was established in Potsdam. In 2006, the college announced that it would be ordaining three new rabbis, the first Reform rabbis to be ordained in Germany since 1942.

Partly owing to the deep similarities between Yiddish and German, Jewish studies has become a very popular subject for academic study, and many German universities have departments or institutes of Jewish studies, culture, or history. Several cities in Germany have Jewish day schools, kosher facilities, and other Jewish institutions beyond synagogues.

On January 27, 2003, German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder signed the first-ever agreement on a federal level with the Central Council, so that Judaism was granted the same elevated, semi-established legal status in Germany as the Roman Catholic and Evangelical Church in Germany, at least since the Basic Law for the Federal Republic of Germany of 1949.

In Germany it is a criminal act to deny the Holocaust or that six million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust (§130 StGB): violations can be punished with up to five years of prison. Germany’s measures against right- wing groups and antisemitism are effective: according to the annual reports of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution the overall number of far-right extremists in Germany has dropped in recent years from 49,700 (2001), to 38,600 in 2006.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_…

On November 9, 2006, the 68th anniversary of Kristallnacht, Munich’s Jewish community celebrated the rededication of Munich’s main synagogue, which was destroyed on Hitler’s orders just before Kristallnacht (or “Night of Broken Glass”) in 1938. The new synagogue and the accompanying Jewish community center opened to the public in 2007. Funding for the synagogue, which cost about $72 million, was provided by the city, the state of Bavaria, and Munich’s Jewish community of 9,200.

Today, the Munich Jewish community has reached over 9,000 members, the same sixe as before World War II. There are four synagogues in the city, including a separate liberal congregation with around 250 members. This growth is largely due to the influx of Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union in the 1990s.

On September 15, 2006, The Adam Geiger College ordained the first rabbis trained in Germany since the country’s last seminary closed in 1942. The three men were trained for four years at the Potsdam school, which is affiliated with the World Union of Progressive Judaism. While Chabad has ordained Orthodox rabbis in Berlin since the Holocaust, none had received their training in Germany. There are 120 Jewish congregations in Germany, but only twenty have full-time rabbis. Two of the newly ordained Reform rabbis plan to stay in Germany.

Throughout the post-war period, anti-Semitism has continued and neo-Nazi groups flourished throughout Germany. Recently, hate crimes and membership in neo-Nazi groups have skyrocketed, and even taken on some political forms in far-right political parties. These parties, however, have been generally unsuccessful in recruiting members from among the German populace, and several have been outlawed by the government. Hate crimes are very strictly punished by the German courts.

Today, Germany is one of the most reliable allies of the State of Israel. Limited diplomatic relations were established between the two states in 1956: in 1965, relations were fully normalized, even though the move led to the severance of relations between Germany and most Arab states. In subsequent years, Germany has become second only to the United States in its economic relations with Israel, by importing and exporting, and providing assistance in the form of grants and loans. Additionally, Germany has played a leading role in shaping the pro-Israel attitudes of many European countries.
http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsou…

Jews In Germany Today

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RE:
Are there any Jews living nowadays in Germany?
I, recently, had to write an essay with the title Race, Folk and Supermen of Nazism. I am starting to get very interested about this subject and was wondering whether there are any Jews living nowadays in Germany. Are they comfortable? Don’t they feel weird? Thanks in advance for…

Yes there are many jews living in germany (btw even Israel looses people to germany) because most jews feel more save in germany than in israel.

That’s interesting

Certainly. In fact, my cousin is the head Rabbi of Munich and he and his family are very comfortable in that area of Germany. There is a strong Jewish population in Germany, in fact.

I’m so glad that Hitler failed – Jews have much to offer civilization as they always did.

Of course there are, they didn’t all leave or else all of the stupid neo-nazis would be happy.

yes there certain are, and the population has quickly grown from new immigration the C.I.S (commonwealth of in dependent states)

Not completely sure about this one

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